Tag Archives: go further

Getting Started

I feel badly that the way I’ve dealt with this 30 day blogging challenge of mine is to write about my workouts almost entirely, but my work is too depressing to write about and I know it bums people out.  However, I know that hearing about my exercise plan, etc. is also not terribly interesting.  I’ve gotten a few comments from people who talk about wishing they were as active as I am (which, really, is not that active).  So I thought I’d talk a little bit about getting started with triathlon.  A lot of people find it pretty intimidating, and I didn’t realize how wrong I had been about how “scary” tris were until I crossed the finish line of my first race a full forty minutes before I expected to. (They had accidentally shortened the run and bike courses, which explained some of it.)

I think for most triathletes, the process starts with running.  Running is the hardest part of a tri, because it comes at the end and it is what is between you and a big slice of pizza and a long nap.  And I would guess that for a lot of us, the first kernels of wanting to do a tri start when we inevitably get injured a year or two into running.  For me, a foot injury that meant I could do no weight bearing exercise meant that I turned to swimming and cycling.  Which meant that, just like that, by the time I was recovered, I could actually do all three elements of a sprint tri.

The next summer, I still felt intimidated, so I bought the book Slow Fat Triathlete.  I love this book.  It’s really helpful for anyone who is at any stage of fitness – I was in really good shape when I bought it, but it still made me feel better about things like needing to take swim lessons and feeling insecure on my bicycle.  She also really dumbs it down for you and tells you what to pack and how to set up your stuff.  I felt like I got all my stupid questions answered and understood how to have a good race.

I also signed up to volunteer at a local triathlon.  I helped with a portion of the bike turnaround course, and it was a small local race on a Wednesday night (to this day, my biggest racing regret is not doing this race and instead chickening out and volunteering, because I could have done it.)  Getting to watch what everyone wore and how they set up and how they did all of the racing stuff also helped me feel more comfortable before I started racing.

I’ve had a couple people tell me that they have felt inspired by me to do a triathlon, and I think that’s awesome.  First of all, because I feel like they recognize I am not a superhuman athlete – I’m actually, seriously, just a normal person.  Normal is the wrong word, but I’m slow, I’m on the heavier end of my BMI range, and I’m almost entirely motivated to exercise by my desire to sleep through the night, and maybe like, 20% my desire to eat cookies and still fit in my pants.  Second, because I genuinely enjoy tri training – it’s hugely challenging for me to push myself to do these new things, and I feel like all the cross training that comes with tri training is really good for me overall and keeps me at my fittest.  I feel like I’m in my best shape when I’m tri training.  So getting to encourage other people to find the joy that I find in it is awesome.

If you are thinking about doing a tri this summer, I can’t recommend enough just getting out and trying to run, bike, and swim each week.  If you find you actually enjoy it, then you might just be cut out for tris.

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Training Plan

So, if I’m going to do an International Distance Tri next year, I need a training plan.  Here are my current steps:

1.) Pick race.  I found a good looking one that is “only” $95 if you include the one day USAT fee.  The date is Sunday, May 18th.  

2.) Join a local tri club. I’m waiting until January 1 to do this, because they do their fees on the calendar year, not a year from when you sign up, so signing up now would be a waste of money.  I have two local tri clubs and I’m trying to decide between them.  The biggest factor is that the bigger, more active, and slightly more conveniently located one does their swims at a park that has jellyfish, and I don’t want to.  

3.) Find a training plan or app.  There are some good free ones out there, but some of the the better looking apps and plans charge. I’m also looking for a plan that allows me to also train for a half-marathon and strength train at the same time. I do not believe these goals are mutually exclusive and I do not believe that I am the only person to try this.

4.) Get a base level of fitness where I can make it through a 6 mile run without my legs feeling tired, through an entire spin class without choking on my lungs, and swim…some distance. Swimming distances confuse me. I think being able to swim about 1000 yards is a good base level for this.

5.) Join a masters swim class. There is one on Saturday mornings I might get up the courage to go to.

What else have I forgotten? Obviously, actually start training, but with a 12 week program, intense training won’t happen until the beginning of March.

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Bike Month

May is bike month, so I will be covering a lot of bike related topics and linking you to some awesome biking related products.

I’ve started bike commuting a lot more lately, and that is partly in thanks to a couple things I’ve done to have a smoother ride, and partly to the nicer weather and ability to ride without wearing a heavy winter coat.  I want to share those things with you and possibly crowdsource some ideas for attire for next winter, so we can all stock up while things are on sale.

So the real question is, what would you all be interested in?  If you bike commute now, would you like to write a guest post about your own wardrobing, safety precautions, and other issues?  If you want to bike commute but aren’t sure where to start, please comment with questions!  If you don’t own a bike, but are interested in purchasing one, what are your concerns?  Comment below and I’ll try to write a post that addresses your concerns.

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Race Report: Nike Women’s Half DC

I had the pleasure of running the Nike Women’s Half Marathon in DC yesterday.  

Photo Apr 28, 10 13 50 AM

I had some major reservations coming into this race because: 

1) My training was hampered by a wedding and also by my own laziness, so I was concerned I would have a difficult race.
2) The race seemed pretty disorganized – our acceptance emails went to our spam folders, the website is pretty useless, and we didn’t get an email about packet pickup until the last week; the expo was in Georgetown (nowhere near the race) which is 25 minutes walking from the nearest metro and is impossible to get through on a Saturday evening.  
3) The race was extremely expensive.  Instead of a finisher medal, you get a Tiffany necklace (presented to you by a fireman in a tuxedo), and you also get a pretty nice Nike shirt, and the entrance requires a lottery, and so I convinced myself that the outrageous entrance fee might be worth it just this once.  

We got to the start line on Sunday morning and were extremely pleased that despite the number of runners, there were more than enough bathrooms.  This is a hallmark of women’s races, I have noticed, and also something that makes me not mind a hefty entrance fee.  There was a line for the first set, but if you walked past them, you got to some very clean port-a-pots with no wait.  We checked our bags at the bag check, which was also well organized with no line, and then went to line up.  The corrals were tricky, because they limited the entrance points and it got really, really crowded.  There were waves, but they didn’t stagger the start, which worked really well.  They did require everyone to wear a wristband with their pace on it and told us that we could only go in the corrals we were paced for.  There were 15,000 runners but I didn’t see a single person with a “wrong” colored wristband in our corral, and we were with other “orange” runners the entire time.  

My only other DC race has been The Cherry Blossom 10 Miler, which is a similar course, slightly smaller crowd, and similar start line Wave Start – CB has had major issues in the past, particularly with crowds and bathrooms, and I would say the Nike Women’s Half did a better job of managing the crowds.   In Cherry Blossom, runners regularly run with other waves, and also start late because they are in the long line for the bathrooms (much better managed this year though).  

Photo Apr 28, 6 40 06 AM

The course for this race was absolutely beautiful – it started off with the capitol framed in the start line, and we went under the mall in a tunnel (running through the bore in a tunnel has always been a race goal of mine, it was pretty cool), up onto the freeway, and then down around the Washington monument, across the bridge to Arlington and back, and in the direction of Georgetown, then we turned around and came back past the Lincoln memorial and down to Haines Point.  That stretch was pretty long and pretty quiet – this race in general did not have the fantastic crowd that many “hometown” races have – the Mall and sights of DC are not residential areas, so it wasn’t like people just came out to watch the race – they had to make an effort, and the race was awfully early.  There were a few “cheer stations” set up, but the ones towards the end were pretty lackluster.  After Haines point, we started to turn back into the Mall and Capitol, which meant actually getting back on the freeway (which was the WORST – it was straight uphill and it was mile 10) .  We had to go back through the same tunnel, which was a little smelly after 10 miles of sweating, but pretty energizing because the band was still going, and the tunnel was mostly downhill.  We rounded out of the tunnel and started heading towards the finish line – fortunately, you couldn’t see it, so we weren’t upset that we were so close to the finish and still had to run around the capitol.  (We were also emotionally prepared for this, since we studied the course map.)  

Mile 12 was where my body shut down a bit and I lost my pacing.  My running buddy was having knee problems and needed to take longer strides, so I told her to go, and at that point people started passing me and I was struggling.  After we rounded the front of the capitol (we didn’t actually have to run around it, which was great), we started coming down Pennsylvania avenue and you could see the finish line…which I thought would be pretty inspiring and make me run faster, but I was pretty tired and couldn’t breathe enough to pick up the pace any.  The finish line looked so small for so long – you could watch it for about .7 miles, which is a pretty long time to be watching a finish line not get any bigger, especially because the crowd wasn’t really generally supportive, it was a lot of people silently holding signs and cheering only for their own friends or family members when they saw them.  

According to my husband, who was at home, the live runner tracking software actually stopped my marker at the 20k mark until I caught up with it because I was so off my projected pace.  However, I finished in 2:07 so I’m not unhappy with my time – the last mile cost me about 2 minutes, since my friend finished in 2:05.  Still pretty good considering my 11-minute-mile pace in training runs lately.  

The water stops were pretty frequent and well organized – with one huge exception, which is that they were not on a consistent side of the road, and they were not on both sides of the road.  They were serving Nuun instead of gatorade, which made me really excited, but once we were on the course I couldn’t find the Nuun when I wanted it, and then I wound up just wanting water the rest of the time.  Mile 4 had Cliff Shot Blocks, which was awesome – they were cut into 3-block sections of a package, so really easy to grab and get out without getting your fingers sticky, and a manageable amount.  I would have been so happy if they had Shot Blocks later in the race, but instead they served mini-luna-bars, which are okay – we split one, and it was just enough for the rest of the race, and I was happy to get “real food” on the race course but another Shot Blocks station would have been appreciated.  Or a random stranger holding trays of gummy bears, but see above, not a residential race.  

The post race was relatively well organized – we came across the finish line – although this was a big first timer race and the girls in front of me got over the finish line and stopped dead, which meant I actually had to pause right before the final timing mat and then walk around them, which was really annoying.  Anyway, past the annoying girls, across the red carpet (which was a fun touch), I found my running buddy and we made our way to the food line, which was sparse – banana, fruit cup, and bagel, plus a bottle of water, and then we got our finisher T-shirts which were seriously adorable, and our necklaces (I felt so bad for the guys in the tuxes, they must have been pretty warm, although they had not just run 13.1 miles so maybe they were a reasonable temperature.)  We passed out of the official finisher area and then walked around – we got some free samples from Bare Minerals and Paul Mitchell (I could complain about the sexism of a race that caters to women, or I could enjoy my hair product samples and admit that women-friendly stuff was part of why I ran the race).  We then found the Kaiser Permanente Stretching Lounge, which will forever be my Happy Place.  They had strawberry-banana smoothies, water in big infusion jars with lemon, mint, watermelon, and basil cucumber.  We also got stretching bands, stress balls, first aid kits, and washcloths.  The washcloths were the GREATEST THING EVER.  

Photo Apr 28, 9 34 58 AM

We made our way back to the bag check, which was where things were pretty disorganized.  The crowds getting both into and out of the corrals were a mess, and then we still had to fight down the sidewalk on Pennsylvania avenue to bag check, but bag check was again easy, and there was plenty of extra water and Nuun around the bag check, which was great since I was pretty dehydrated, and there were still plenty of fairly clean and available bathrooms.  

On the metro ride back, we debated whether we would run this race again, given the hassle of travel and the extreme cost.  I tend to think that the race was definitely worth it to do once, but I’m not sure that I’ll feel a strong pull towards doing it again.  I definitely am considering the Rock and Roll USA half though -it’s earlier in the year, so less hot, and more residential, so hopefully a better crowd.  I have also loved the GW Parkway Classic in the past, which is a great race and I would also happily do again.  

Have you ever run one of the Nike Women’s Races?  What makes a great half marathon for you?

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Race Report: Shamrock Marathon Virginia Beach

We picked the Shamrock Marathon for a couple of reasons:

1) It was in March.  We wanted to train in the winter and run a springtime race because it wouldn’t be so hot to train for or run.
2) It is a pretty big race. We wanted a good crowd of people to keep us going.
3) It was flat.

I’m really really happy we picked Shamrock.  Mostly because of reason number 3, because reasons 1 and 2 turned out to not be so true.   I’ll start at the beginning.

When we woke up, it was pretty mild out.  We got dressed in shorts and t-shirts for the most part, because it was warmer than even the weather report had called for.  We made our way to the start line, which was pretty well organized and had pacers marking every 30 minute interval.  Two of us lined up with the 3:25 group and three of us lined up with the 4:30 group.  There were four starting corrals, but it was unclear what it meant or how they grouped us into them, but it helped keep stuff relatively organized.

We had agreed to start at a 10 minute pace, and we did.  We chugged along nicely behind the 4:30 group and skipped the first water stop (it was on the left, we were on the right, and we didn’t notice it.)  Somewhere around Mile 2 or 3 was the Bridge.  The bridge was the only real hill we encountered on the run.  We were told in advance to not be the sissies that walked over the Bridge, but after running Uwharrie, that bridge was a piece of cake both times we ran it.  After the bridge, we got to the next water stop, where we stopped and noticed that we were already sweating.  There were water stops every mile and a half, which seemed excessive when we first read through the book, but on race day, they were necessary.  The first ten miles took us south of VA beach, through one of the military bases that was there.  This was one of the coolest parts of the race – we got to run past crazy helicopters and all of the enlisted men came out to cheer us on and give us high-fives.  They were fantastic and totally made my day – I always consider military folk to be absolutely the most hardcore, badass people I’ve ever met, and here they were acting like we were awesome.

Around 9.5 miles, we hit the bridge again.  My friend J. fell down and S. stayed with her while I stayed with our pace group (I was too in the zone to see J. fall and we had agreed we would stay with the 4:30 runners and catch up to it if any of us fell behind at a water stop, etc.).  I was still feeling really good at this point.  We ran through downtown Virginia Beach again, through the boardwalk and then out onto Atlantic Avenue and hit the 13 mile mark.  Shortly after that was the 13.1 mark, and we started looking for S’s parents, who were cheering from the sidelines and waving giddily at us.  S’s mom joined us for a few short moments and checked in on how we were all doing.  Once we left them, we started looking for my sister, who I knew was going to camp out around Mile 14.  At Mile 14, there she was, with my husband and my brother-in-law.  I grabbed a handful of gummi bears from them, because my husband was on the other side of the course with my peanut butter and jelly sandwich.

I was able to hang-ish with J. and S. for another two miles, but around Mile 16, J. and I went to the bathroom.  I could feel myself falling back, and I knew I was through the toughest part of the race and it was downhill from there, and I could do it on my own, so I told J. to go ahead and that I’d see them at the finish.  As I powered through Mile 16, I thought about my iPod Shuffle which was in my SpiBelt.  I had put together a playlist for the race, since I knew I would be running at least a portion of it on my own.  I decided that I would break out my shuffle at the next water stop if I really needed to, so I ran for the next mile, enjoying the cheesy shamrock and leprechaun jokes that were on the sides of the race course and enjoying the company of the crowd.  At mile 17, I had a bite of my cliff bar, but couldn’t even get it down because my mouth was so dry and I didn’t have enough water yet.  Around here, I passed the Lululemon race station, which was awesome and they were blasting music and waving signs and cheering everybody on, and we all picked up the pace for a bit at that.  At this point, I settled into a groove, but it was hard to ignore how much I was hurting.

Thanks to an utterly fantastic tape job on my knee by E’s husband, my right knee, which would usually be bothering me by now, wasn’t at all, but everything was just starting to hurt.  I was pleased to notice that my toenails weren’t hurting yet, which was good.  At mile 18, I thought with relief, “ah, only 6 more miles” and then realized that I cannot do math.  Around here, we went through Ft. Story, which my friend warned me was really boring.  It was true.  There was virtually no-one here, and we were all low on energy and just trying to get through to the end.  And it was HOT.  It was really hot out.  It was whatever my temperature threshold where I have to run slower because I get sick running fast in the heat.  One rest stop around Mile 20 had a table of food, including bananas, which I snagged, and jelly beans, which I tried to eat but instead got rid of.  I started walking at the water stops plus a bit at this point, because I was just feeling so leaden, but I realized pretty quickly that my body hurt more if I tried to walk than running, but my lungs hurt more if I ran.  So I kept running.  And I ran most of the way until Mile 23, which I knew would put us back on the crowd-heavy part of the course.

Around Mile 22-23 we came out of Ft. Story and back into the residential part, which wasn’t nearly as crowded as earlier – because a lot of people had finished, and even more people had gone to watch their racers cross the finish line, but I knew that my team was still going to be at Mile 25, so I kept going.  I wanted to look strong for them, and I felt like it was very important that I not let them down by walking the last three miles.  I felt my toenails and my feet felt so swollen.  My back had started to hurt, and my calves and hamstrings were incredibly tight.  I was running at the same pace that several people around me were walking at.

At Mile 25, I was relieved to see that my sister was dressed in her running capris and her green t-shirt from our wedding weekend 5k.  She had told me she was bringing running clothes in case I needed a pacer, but I wasn’t sure she’d be ready.  I’ve never been so happy to see her, and as I passed them, I said, “are you coming?” and she jumped out to join me.  She gossiped with me, let me complain about my back, ankles, feet, legs, everything else, and got me through the last mile.  As we tore towards the finish line, she hopped off to the fenced in spectator areas and I crossed at 4:55 clock time (4:48 chip time) and hobbled to pick up my medal, hat, sweatshirt, and then got handed water, gatorade, a banana, and a shamrock shaped cookie.

I expected to feel something huge and powerful after finishing.  I expected it to feel as emotional as finishing Uwharrie.  I expected to let an incredible sense of accomplishment wash over me.  Instead, I just felt tired, and I felt a desperate need to put on the crocs I knew were in my dry bag.  My sister met up with me and got me my crocs and then we walked over to the beer tent and met up with everybody else.  Team in Training was selling cokes and I bought one and downed it, and after that I started to feel better.  We all hung out at the tent for a bit and then hobbled back to our hotel (Holiday Inn Express – can’t recommend it enough – clean, reasonably priced, nice showers, comfortable beds) where three of us made quick work of a bag of potato chips (my favorite post-race food, and especially important for our gluten-free friend.)  We also realized that we were all sunburned and chafed (I will write more about what to pack in your marathon race bag later.)

So that’s that.  I get to check it off my 30×30 list, and make a nifty race-medal/bib shadowbox, and put a sticker on my car, and all of those other annoying marathon-y things that people do.  And I think, much like being married and being a lawyer and being 26, being a marathon runner is something that I have to settle into a bit, because it is kind of huge.

 

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Go Further: January

I ran 14 miles on Monday this week, and have generally taken off otherwise. I made it to yoga on Wednesday and the gym this morning. Yesterday I tested out my new Salomon trail runners, which are pretty good but not totally perfect so I’m going to test one more pair and then decide and break in a new pair of shoes in 2 weeks. This isn’t smart. Don’t do this.

We have a 16 mile run on the calendar for this weekend, but it’s supposed to freezing rain tomorrow and then Sunday I have to decide if I want to play hockey after running 16 miles. A big part of me thinks I can do it. The rational part of me knows I will be exhausted and useless. But I’ve played games exhausted and useless. So I’m torn. I think I’m going to wait until tomorrow and see how bad the rain is and then make a decision. But this seems like a great time to test my fancy new running/cycling raincoat.
How is everyone else doing?

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30 by 30 – Progress Report

Becky inspired me to update my 30×30 list.  I decided that I’m going to leave it un “finished” for now, because I might add things to it in the next four years.
  1. Run a marathon (in progress – hopefully will meet on March 18)
  2. Do a century bike ride
  3. Do an Olympic distance triathlon
  4. Make my own cheese (done)
  5. Make my own yogurt (done)
  6. Go back to Egypt
  7. Do a trail race (hopefully will be achieved on February 4th)
  8. Pace my friend E. on one of her Ultramarathons (done! twice!)
  9. Go diving in the pacific ocean
  10. Take an overnight train trip with my husband
  11. Put a backsplash up in the kitchen (done!)
  12. Grow vegetables (we are on the waiting list for a community plot)
  13. Go on a racecation (race + vacation)
  14. Volunteer at the nature center where we got married
  15. Try CrossFit
  16. Take a boxing class
  17. Take a photography class (done – I took a four week intermediate photography class this fall)
  18. Take baked goods to the new neighbors
  19. Go to Australia
  20. Do a bike tour of Niagra wineries
  21. Do a beer tour somewhere new
  22. See a Broadway play
  23. Run a half-marathon in under 2 hours
  24. Learn Spanish
  25. Score the winning goal in a hockey game (done!)
  26. Earn a salary and have health insurance.

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Good Things About 2011 (And Better Things To Come in 2012)

2011 was, for the most part, for me, clouded by one thing, and one thing only – the loss of a very dear friend.  As my parents health starts to fail and they get older, that pain is compounded by the fact that we no longer have our dear friend, the one my sister and I could always turn to and who we thought would be there for us as our own parents aged, is no longer here.  Instead, we struggle with being there for his family as they need us, and we struggle to accept his death as anything more than a completely senseless tragedy that did not need to happen.

So that was the downside of 2011.  But, in keeping with the spirit of Petite Chablis and her post, I’m now going to say the things that happened in 2011 that didn’t completely suck.  In 2011, I:

-Got a job!!! Two, actually.  I got my first attorney job, where I learned how to be an attorney, and then I got my law clerk job, where I have learned to be a private-practice attorney.  I’ve been very lucky to have wonderfully supportive bosses in both cases who are committed to helping me be the best attorney I can be.

-Ran a ten miler and a half marathon!  I didn’t meet my time goals for either race, but I’m happy that I’m not injured and I’m doing really well with my marathon training.

-Lost 14lbs!  I finally shed the pesky post-wedding weight and the five pounds that showed up my third year of law school and wouldn’t leave.

-Decided to keep my name!  I am really proud that I finally came to a decision, and also really happy that it’s the decision that involved the least amount of work.

-Went on a bike trip through Wales!  Without fighting with my husband AT ALL.  It was really amazing.  We also did several long bike rides leading up to it, which was awesome.

-Went camping, twice.  Goal is to go 4 times in 2012.

-Read a LOT of books.  Thinking about it, I think I read somewhere between 15 and 20 books in 2011.  Thank goodness for libraries and library lending on Kindle!

-Made new friends.  I made new friends on the internet, in the city where I live, and within the legal community.  I also kept in touch with old friends in a meaningful way, which takes a lot of totally-worth-it effort.

2012 will hopefully bring me a finished marathon, a finished half-ironman (or at least Olympic Distance triathlon!), a PR for my half-marathon, a permanent, salaried, lawyer job, and a solid relationship with my spouse, my family, and my friends.

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Go Further: December Challenge

Boy was I glad for the challenge this week!  If I hadn’t had it, I would have slacked off and not exercised at least four days.  One or two days is okay, but if I go four days without working out, I start sleeping poorly and get crabby.  I did Ripped in 30 on Monday and it wasn’t even as annoying this time.  On Tuesday, I slept in and only did a 10-minute yoga video, and on Wednesday I finally got myself to the yoga class I desperately needed (14 mile runs are killer).  Thursday I went running and today I walked on the Treadmill.  I missed my run goal, but met my workout goal, so I’m pretty pleased.  Here’s hoping I can keep it up through the weekend.  The holidays are tough.

How is everybody else doing?  Are you also overindulging in the office tootsie roll bin?  (Seriously, the diet starts next week.  I’m planning to dramatically decrease my sugar intake so that I can finally get some energy and focus back.  I’ll probably talk about it here.)

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Go Further: October Challenge!

How is everybody doing? I’m doing surprisingly well this week, all things considered. On Saturday and Sunday, I went for a run. I did six miles on Saturday and about two on Sunday (plus a two mile walk). On Monday, I did a yoga workout on Hulu that was pretty terrible – the instructor was annoying and the workout got interrupted by commercials, which is why workouts on Hulu kinda suck.

I also went running on Tuesday and Wednesday. I did about two miles on Tuesday and three on Wednesday. It might sound like I’m running a lot, and I am, because apparently, I’m marathon training. We haven’t started our formal training program yet, but I’m stepping up my mileage and trying to get used to making time for running during the week, since I’m going to need to be running 3-4 days a week to train for the marathon.

I also went to yoga. And I’m going to yoga again today. The studio near me started a Wednesday night “community” class, which is only $6. It was a hot class and it was really good. The instructor was new and pretty good, but she clearly doesn’t yet have the soothing yoga instructor voice down, and she was a smidgen perky, and she played music that was a little more rock & roll than I usually like, but that made class pass really fast.

This morning I did Ripped in 30 again, and Jillian is annoying me a little less, but I don’t yet feel like this workout is as good as 30 Day Shred. Part of it is that it takes up more space. So she has you go from squats to the mat to do presses, etc. and since you only have 30 seconds for each exercise and it takes longer to set up, because you have to put the mat back and then lie down and then get set up for the exercise. Then you go up into side-to-side lunges, which we don’t really have room for. I think this problem could be solved by rearranging the furniture and maybe cleaning, but for now, I’m at least less annoyed by Jillian and her incessant weirdness.

I think tomorrow morning I’m either going to do Ripped in 30 again, or go for a run. I’m supposed to do 10-miles this weekend, but am probably going to do that on Sunday.

How is everybody else doing? It’s supposed to snow this weekend (WTF) and there seems to be some frost outside this morning, so we are heading into winter – how are you planning to keep the winter blahs from settling in?

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